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With almost 5000km on the clock it’s time for a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Long term update!
Ok I’m just going to spit out my thoughts in point form for this one but you’ll get the picture. Oh and I’m also going to include imperial measurements for our international friends. ;)
EV Range: The real world driving around town range of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is officially 40km (24miles) We achieve this figure daily in normal day to day driving. Could you do better by driving in economy run mode? Possibly, but this is the figure for normal day to day driving.
Fuel Range: We’re averaging 1400km (869 miles) to a $45 tank of petrol, this includes an average of one 400km (248mile) highway trip on petrol each tank of fuel. If we didn’t do any long highway trips we could potentially drive all year on that one tank of fuel. A $45 fill up here equates to about 30 litres or 8 US gallons.
Fuel Economy: From tank to tank we’re averaging 1400km (869 miles) or (2.14 L/100km (132MPG), very much in line with Mitsubishi’s quoted 1.9L/100km figures. On the highway sections we average 5.8L/100km (40.56MPG) for longer distance trips. For example, on a typical trip to Melbourne and back (approx 300km or 186miles) I charge the PHEV to full capacity and then hit the ‘SAVE’ button to keep my electric power for any hills I encounter. By the time I hit melbourne I’m down to a very low level, which is good as it takes much less energy to charge the battery in this state then if it was near full. If I don’t have enough battery in reserve I hit the ‘CHARGE’ button and charge the PHEV back up to half full as I’m approaching the city. This gives me enough to do all my running around in the city. I like to start the return journey with at least a half full charge to keep for any bigger hills so I hit charge on any free flowing freeway sections in Melbourne where the petrol engine is doing very little work at 100kph (60MPH).
Highway Driving: So basically, on a long trip I use the petrol engine for the flat bits, the Electric motor for hills and I hit the ‘CHARGE’ button for extended downhill sections. This allows me to consistently achieve 5.8L/100km (40.56MPG) on a long highway trip. Not bad at all for a vehicle of this size.
Comfort: Seats we both find very comfortable, especially on the highway and over long distances. Heating and air conditioning both work well and efficiently and suspension and handling is both reasonably taught whilst still being compliant. Sound highway and round town performer.
Performance: The LEAF gets away quicker from the lights but the PHEV is not far behind. The petrol engine has a competent amount of power for highway travelling and climbing steeper hills. Electric motors pull up steeper hills at highway speeds with ease.
Wishlist: The base model needs the app that comes standard with the Aspire, primarily for the ability to charge the vehicle to 80% capacity only.
Cost to Run: Noticed an increase of electricity consumption compared to LEAF - suspect that the inability to only charge to 80% capacity may be the culprit. That last 20% requires more energy than the previous 80% to bring the battery up to full capacity and charging to 100% everytime is sure to use more energy.
We went from zero electric bills with the LEAF to having to pay some, not liking that. Going to try charging the PHEV during the middle of the day when we are generating the most electricity from our solar panels rather than charging off peak overnight. Also going to manually stop the charge cycle short so as not to allow the vehicle to charge to 100%. A capacity of around 80% easily covers our daily driving needs and will definitely extend the life of the batteries and should reduce electricity consumption.
Observation: Outlander PHEV uses more petrol in winter around town - due to petrol engine starting up to warm vehicle once temperature drops below 10 degrees C.
Observation: Don’t hit the CHARGE button on highway trips unless the battery is under half full. One trip I thought I’d keep the battery as full as I could for use in the next city but I noticed I used a lot more fuel when hitting the ‘CHARGE’ button on the downhill sections. I then remembered that lithium batteries need a lot more energy to recharge that last 20% of capacity. Going from 0 - 80% is pretty easy but that last 20% of capacity needs to be forced in and requires more energy, it’s just the nature of lithium batteries. I now let the batteries drain to under half full before hitting the CHARGE button on the downhill sections. I use a lot less fuel on the highway this way which allows me to achieve 5.8L/100km (40.56MPG).
Overall: We’re very happy with build quality and reliability of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - absolutely no issues to report other than I bent the bracket holding the EV charge flap. It sticks out a rather long way when open and caught on my jacket as I was walking past the vehicle. I tried to re-adjust the bracket holding the flap but the gap is a little off when closed now. Watch this when charging your PHEV, I don’t leave the flap all the way open now. I could see this being an issue when charging at public car parks, something we are yet to do.
PHEV versus LEAF? Ok so which is better, all EV driving or Petrol Hybrid driving? I have to say, as good as the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is, we both still prefer the LEAF. There’s just something about the smooth, quiet, powerful experience of all EV motoring. If Nissan or Mitsubishi release a LEAF type vehicle with a 300 - 400km range we would definitely make that our next vehicle, we do both still absolutely prefer all EV driving.
Until next time!
Paul
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With almost 5000km on the clock it’s time for a Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Long term update!

Ok I’m just going to spit out my thoughts in point form for this one but you’ll get the picture. Oh and I’m also going to include imperial measurements for our international friends. ;)

EV Range: The real world driving around town range of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is officially 40km (24miles) We achieve this figure daily in normal day to day driving. Could you do better by driving in economy run mode? Possibly, but this is the figure for normal day to day driving.

Fuel Range: We’re averaging 1400km (869 miles) to a $45 tank of petrol, this includes an average of one 400km (248mile) highway trip on petrol each tank of fuel. If we didn’t do any long highway trips we could potentially drive all year on that one tank of fuel. A $45 fill up here equates to about 30 litres or 8 US gallons.

Fuel Economy: From tank to tank we’re averaging 1400km (869 miles) or (2.14 L/100km (132MPG), very much in line with Mitsubishi’s quoted 1.9L/100km figures. On the highway sections we average 5.8L/100km (40.56MPG) for longer distance trips. For example, on a typical trip to Melbourne and back (approx 300km or 186miles) I charge the PHEV to full capacity and then hit the ‘SAVE’ button to keep my electric power for any hills I encounter. By the time I hit melbourne I’m down to a very low level, which is good as it takes much less energy to charge the battery in this state then if it was near full. If I don’t have enough battery in reserve I hit the ‘CHARGE’ button and charge the PHEV back up to half full as I’m approaching the city. This gives me enough to do all my running around in the city. I like to start the return journey with at least a half full charge to keep for any bigger hills so I hit charge on any free flowing freeway sections in Melbourne where the petrol engine is doing very little work at 100kph (60MPH).

Highway Driving: So basically, on a long trip I use the petrol engine for the flat bits, the Electric motor for hills and I hit the ‘CHARGE’ button for extended downhill sections. This allows me to consistently achieve 5.8L/100km (40.56MPG) on a long highway trip. Not bad at all for a vehicle of this size.

Comfort: Seats we both find very comfortable, especially on the highway and over long distances. Heating and air conditioning both work well and efficiently and suspension and handling is both reasonably taught whilst still being compliant. Sound highway and round town performer.

Performance: The LEAF gets away quicker from the lights but the PHEV is not far behind. The petrol engine has a competent amount of power for highway travelling and climbing steeper hills. Electric motors pull up steeper hills at highway speeds with ease.

Wishlist: The base model needs the app that comes standard with the Aspire, primarily for the ability to charge the vehicle to 80% capacity only.

Cost to Run: Noticed an increase of electricity consumption compared to LEAF - suspect that the inability to only charge to 80% capacity may be the culprit. That last 20% requires more energy than the previous 80% to bring the battery up to full capacity and charging to 100% everytime is sure to use more energy.

We went from zero electric bills with the LEAF to having to pay some, not liking that. Going to try charging the PHEV during the middle of the day when we are generating the most electricity from our solar panels rather than charging off peak overnight. Also going to manually stop the charge cycle short so as not to allow the vehicle to charge to 100%. A capacity of around 80% easily covers our daily driving needs and will definitely extend the life of the batteries and should reduce electricity consumption.

Observation: Outlander PHEV uses more petrol in winter around town - due to petrol engine starting up to warm vehicle once temperature drops below 10 degrees C.

Observation: Don’t hit the CHARGE button on highway trips unless the battery is under half full. One trip I thought I’d keep the battery as full as I could for use in the next city but I noticed I used a lot more fuel when hitting the ‘CHARGE’ button on the downhill sections. I then remembered that lithium batteries need a lot more energy to recharge that last 20% of capacity. Going from 0 - 80% is pretty easy but that last 20% of capacity needs to be forced in and requires more energy, it’s just the nature of lithium batteries. I now let the batteries drain to under half full before hitting the CHARGE button on the downhill sections. I use a lot less fuel on the highway this way which allows me to achieve 5.8L/100km (40.56MPG).

Overall: We’re very happy with build quality and reliability of the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV - absolutely no issues to report other than I bent the bracket holding the EV charge flap. It sticks out a rather long way when open and caught on my jacket as I was walking past the vehicle. I tried to re-adjust the bracket holding the flap but the gap is a little off when closed now. Watch this when charging your PHEV, I don’t leave the flap all the way open now. I could see this being an issue when charging at public car parks, something we are yet to do.

PHEV versus LEAF? Ok so which is better, all EV driving or Petrol Hybrid driving? I have to say, as good as the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is, we both still prefer the LEAF. There’s just something about the smooth, quiet, powerful experience of all EV motoring. If Nissan or Mitsubishi release a LEAF type vehicle with a 300 - 400km range we would definitely make that our next vehicle, we do both still absolutely prefer all EV driving.

Until next time!

Paul

Tesla halts Model S assembly, prepares for Model X

Tesla Motors has halted production of the Model S electric car while it upgrades the assembly line for its next vehicle—the Model X crossover.

A two-week production hiatus will give the firm enough time to complete a full $100 million upgrade to the plant, before production restarts at increased speed.

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1093436_tesla-halts-model-s-assembly-prepares-for-model-x?email

Just picked up the Outlander PHEV from King’s Mitsubishi in Ballarat where our Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV had it’s first service. The first service/inspection is due at (1500km) and is free! We had no glitches to report when dropping off the vehicle and everything checked out perfectly their end! Most impressed. The next service is due at 15,000km or 12 months from vehicle registration date. I much prefer the 12 monthly service intervals of Mitsubishi compared to the 6 monthly services of Nissan. The service at Kings was great and the people their were very warm and friendly… and they even washed the car!! How good is that.
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Just picked up the Outlander PHEV from King’s Mitsubishi in Ballarat where our Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV had it’s first service. The first service/inspection is due at (1500km) and is free! We had no glitches to report when dropping off the vehicle and everything checked out perfectly their end! Most impressed. The next service is due at 15,000km or 12 months from vehicle registration date. I much prefer the 12 monthly service intervals of Mitsubishi compared to the 6 monthly services of Nissan. The service at Kings was great and the people their were very warm and friendly… and they even washed the car!! How good is that.

I have to admit to being more than a little perplexed by the Outlander PHEV’s recent petrol engine startups. For no apparent reason, or so I thought, the petrol engine would start up and run consistently for a few minutes while driving and then shut off returning me back to full EV mode. The perplexing thing was that it appeared to be random and interestingly would only happen late at night, and often around midnight when I was picking my son up from work. I initially surmised that the petrol engine may have needed to cycle itself once a month or something similar but I now believe that is not the case and may now have the answer… Cold temperatures!! Our daytime Winter temperatures have been around 9-12C, not cold enough to provoke the phenomena, but late at night it has been dropping to a lot lower, around 6 degrees celcius and around 7C seems to be the switching point for the engine startups. The mysterious start-ups have always appeared to be directly connected to the vehicle’s heating system. I could get the petrol engine to shut off while driving by turning off the heating/demisting system but the petrol engine would persistently restart and then shut itself off when it was ready.  So what was happening? Ok, so here’s what I think. Once the temperature drops to below 7 degrees the petrol engine needs to start up to provide heating for the climate control system and to bring itself to a comfortable operating temperature presumably to protect itself from constant cold stop/starting. It only takes a few minutes to warm the engine up but once it’s warm the cabin is also nice and comfortable and the petrol engine shuts off and goes back into hibernation mode. My constantly interrupting the process by turning off the climate system probably wasn’t helping things :0 From now on I’m just going to let the Outlander PHEV do it’s thing and warm up the vehicle, turns out PHEV knows best :) Oh and I like the little warning the PHEV gives when the temperature drops to 3C, knowing I have constant all wheel electric drive in these conditions is very comforting.
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I have to admit to being more than a little perplexed by the Outlander PHEV’s recent petrol engine startups. For no apparent reason, or so I thought, the petrol engine would start up and run consistently for a few minutes while driving and then shut off returning me back to full EV mode. The perplexing thing was that it appeared to be random and interestingly would only happen late at night, and often around midnight when I was picking my son up from work. I initially surmised that the petrol engine may have needed to cycle itself once a month or something similar but I now believe that is not the case and may now have the answer… Cold temperatures!! Our daytime Winter temperatures have been around 9-12C, not cold enough to provoke the phenomena, but late at night it has been dropping to a lot lower, around 6 degrees celcius and around 7C seems to be the switching point for the engine startups. The mysterious start-ups have always appeared to be directly connected to the vehicle’s heating system. I could get the petrol engine to shut off while driving by turning off the heating/demisting system but the petrol engine would persistently restart and then shut itself off when it was ready.  So what was happening? Ok, so here’s what I think. Once the temperature drops to below 7 degrees the petrol engine needs to start up to provide heating for the climate control system and to bring itself to a comfortable operating temperature presumably to protect itself from constant cold stop/starting. It only takes a few minutes to warm the engine up but once it’s warm the cabin is also nice and comfortable and the petrol engine shuts off and goes back into hibernation mode. My constantly interrupting the process by turning off the climate system probably wasn’t helping things :0 From now on I’m just going to let the Outlander PHEV do it’s thing and warm up the vehicle, turns out PHEV knows best :) Oh and I like the little warning the PHEV gives when the temperature drops to 3C, knowing I have constant all wheel electric drive in these conditions is very comforting.

Nissan announces replacement Battery Pack pricing for the LEAF - $5,500 for a 2015 spec battery pack
From Autobloggreen - Nissan’s Brian Brockman, writing at My Nissan Leaf, announced that Nissan Leaf replacement batteries are now available to purchase at certified Leaf dealers in the US at a suggested retail price of $5,499. These packs are the ones found in 2015 Leaf models, which are similar to the ones the Leaf has always had, just with a different, better battery chemistry. To buy a new pack, you need to give Nissan your original battery pack (which Nissan says will be recycled and has a value of $1,000) and the $5,500 “does not include tax, installation fees or an installation kit required for 2011 and 2012 vehicles.” That kit costs around $225. A $100/month financing program will still be available (details will be made available later) but now it will have an end date and the driver will own the pack at the end of the payment process. All replacement packs will have the same eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty as the battery in a new Leaf. You can read Brockman’s full statement below or over on My Nissan Leaf.
Great news for LEAF owners!
Nissan announces replacement Battery Pack pricing for the LEAF - $5,500 for a 2015 spec battery pack
From Autobloggreen - Nissan’s Brian Brockman, writing at My Nissan Leaf, announced that Nissan Leaf replacement batteries are now available to purchase at certified Leaf dealers in the US at a suggested retail price of $5,499. These packs are the ones found in 2015 Leaf models, which are similar to the ones the Leaf has always had, just with a different, better battery chemistry. To buy a new pack, you need to give Nissan your original battery pack (which Nissan says will be recycled and has a value of $1,000) and the $5,500 “does not include tax, installation fees or an installation kit required for 2011 and 2012 vehicles.” That kit costs around $225. A $100/month financing program will still be available (details will be made available later) but now it will have an end date and the driver will own the pack at the end of the payment process. All replacement packs will have the same eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty as the battery in a new Leaf. You can read Brockman’s full statement below or over on My Nissan Leaf.
Great news for LEAF owners!

Nissan announces replacement Battery Pack pricing for the LEAF - $5,500 for a 2015 spec battery pack

From AutobloggreenNissan’s Brian Brockman, writing at My Nissan Leaf, announced that Nissan Leaf replacement batteries are now available to purchase at certified Leaf dealers in the US at a suggested retail price of $5,499. These packs are the ones found in 2015 Leaf models, which are similar to the ones the Leaf has always had, just with a different, better battery chemistry. To buy a new pack, you need to give Nissan your original battery pack (which Nissan says will be recycled and has a value of $1,000) and the $5,500 “does not include tax, installation fees or an installation kit required for 2011 and 2012 vehicles.” That kit costs around $225. A $100/month financing program will still be available (details will be made available later) but now it will have an end date and the driver will own the pack at the end of the payment process. All replacement packs will have the same eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty as the battery in a new Leaf. You can read Brockman’s full statement below or over on My Nissan Leaf.

Great news for LEAF owners!

acowan84 asked:

Hi there, i live in scotland and im picking up my outlander on friday :) After doing some research i remember reading that the car will just kick in the engine for a few minutes to keep the engine healthy this would be to cover the components with oil and probably do some sort of self diagnostics. This is probably what you were thinking anyways.

Excellent! Thanks for the response Acowan84, great to get some confirmation and also to hear from someone in Scotland! Enjoy your new Outlander :)

So I’m at the service station to fill up our Outlander PHEV for the first time and I realise that I don’t know how to open the fuel filler! I’m sure this was demonstrated to me ages ago when we first picked up the car but I can’t remember or seem to work it out. The EV side is easy, we do that all the time but neither of us have ever had to put fuel in the Outlander. We’ve travelled 1400 odd kilometres on the original tank of fuel that came with the car and the fuel gauge is still showing a third full! We don’t really need to put fuel in but with the Iraq situation I’m thinking it might be wise to top it up before prices go spiralling upwards. I’m pressing the hatch in expecting it to pop open as it does on the electric side but nothing is happening, I look back inside the cabin, can’t spot a fuel release lever, I go back, make sure the car is unlocked and try pushing the hatch in again… nothing. I’m starting to feel like a bit of a twit when I go back to the cabin for one more look. It’s a dark full winters day and the rain is coming in sideways (well that’s my excuse) and feel around on the floor for some sort of lever or latch, bingo! The fuel release lever is an unmarked black plastic affair which resembles a structural component attached to the floor, completely black, no markings. I try pulling it up and the hatch pops open! I fill the car right up past more than a few clicks and the grand total comes to $44. Not bad, not bad at all. 
More observations: The weather is cold, wet and miserable right now in Ballarat, a typical Ballarat winter and I’ve noticed a few interesting things with the PHEV. I initially thought that my night time range was being adversely affected by the headlights being on, but now I’m not so sure, I think the real culprit might be the climate control system. The windows have been fogging up and I’ve been using the demister with the AC on to rapidly clear the screen, works perfectly but it may be the reason the battery is draining so quickly at night. Now you’ve got to remember it’s cold, wet and completely miserable so I’ve got the headlights on, the auto wipers are going consistently, the rear wiper is on, the rear demister is on and the AC is also running in conjuction with the heating and windscreen demister, a fair load on the system. Oh and the radio is on too :) But the most curious thing is the petrol engine starting up and running even when I have a near full battery in these conditions. I can get it to stop by turning off the climate control system and the petrol engine doesn’t necessarily restart when I turn the demister back on. I’m not quite sure what the connection is there, maybe someone can explain? Even more curious was the petrol engine starting up and running for no apparent reason the other night. The battery was over half full, I turned off the climate system but the petrol engine kept running. It did this for about 5 minutes then went back to sleep and didn’t start up again. I’m thinking this might be one of two things… [A] the petrol engine needs to cycle itself once a month to prevent things clogging up or [B] we aren’t doing any long trips and the 12v battery may need charging through the alternator system. Not sure how all that works, again if anybody knows let me know! 
To sum up, we are still delighted with our Outlander PHEV purchase and as you can see from the above screen it is now due for it’s first 1500km service. Will let you know how all that goes!
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So I’m at the service station to fill up our Outlander PHEV for the first time and I realise that I don’t know how to open the fuel filler! I’m sure this was demonstrated to me ages ago when we first picked up the car but I can’t remember or seem to work it out. The EV side is easy, we do that all the time but neither of us have ever had to put fuel in the Outlander. We’ve travelled 1400 odd kilometres on the original tank of fuel that came with the car and the fuel gauge is still showing a third full! We don’t really need to put fuel in but with the Iraq situation I’m thinking it might be wise to top it up before prices go spiralling upwards. I’m pressing the hatch in expecting it to pop open as it does on the electric side but nothing is happening, I look back inside the cabin, can’t spot a fuel release lever, I go back, make sure the car is unlocked and try pushing the hatch in again… nothing. I’m starting to feel like a bit of a twit when I go back to the cabin for one more look. It’s a dark full winters day and the rain is coming in sideways (well that’s my excuse) and feel around on the floor for some sort of lever or latch, bingo! The fuel release lever is an unmarked black plastic affair which resembles a structural component attached to the floor, completely black, no markings. I try pulling it up and the hatch pops open! I fill the car right up past more than a few clicks and the grand total comes to $44. Not bad, not bad at all. 

More observations: The weather is cold, wet and miserable right now in Ballarat, a typical Ballarat winter and I’ve noticed a few interesting things with the PHEV. I initially thought that my night time range was being adversely affected by the headlights being on, but now I’m not so sure, I think the real culprit might be the climate control system. The windows have been fogging up and I’ve been using the demister with the AC on to rapidly clear the screen, works perfectly but it may be the reason the battery is draining so quickly at night. Now you’ve got to remember it’s cold, wet and completely miserable so I’ve got the headlights on, the auto wipers are going consistently, the rear wiper is on, the rear demister is on and the AC is also running in conjuction with the heating and windscreen demister, a fair load on the system. Oh and the radio is on too :) But the most curious thing is the petrol engine starting up and running even when I have a near full battery in these conditions. I can get it to stop by turning off the climate control system and the petrol engine doesn’t necessarily restart when I turn the demister back on. I’m not quite sure what the connection is there, maybe someone can explain? Even more curious was the petrol engine starting up and running for no apparent reason the other night. The battery was over half full, I turned off the climate system but the petrol engine kept running. It did this for about 5 minutes then went back to sleep and didn’t start up again. I’m thinking this might be one of two things… [A] the petrol engine needs to cycle itself once a month to prevent things clogging up or [B] we aren’t doing any long trips and the 12v battery may need charging through the alternator system. Not sure how all that works, again if anybody knows let me know! 

To sum up, we are still delighted with our Outlander PHEV purchase and as you can see from the above screen it is now due for it’s first 1500km service. Will let you know how all that goes!

emeraldgreen108 asked:

Hi, I just ordered an Outlander Phev. Do you know of any 3rd party Spare Tire mount that attaches to the tow bar. I thought I found one, but now suppect it will not fit. Thanks

Congrats Emeraldgreen! Re Spare tire mounts, haven’t considered that option but I did come across this site which may be of value. http://www.tiregate.com/hg-series/  I did a search on Hitch Mount Spare Tire Carrier. They may have a reseller here.

We’ve just ordered our Outlander PHEV and are looking for a spare tire carrier?

Thanks for the question EmeraldGreen! I’ve had to paraphrase your question as TUMBLR deleted your message after I responded, I’m just not sure where tumblr responded my reply to? I did a quick search on Hitch Mount Spare Tire Carriers and this site seemed to have a good range of options http://www.tiregate.com/hg-series/ Might be a good place to start. Their Australian reseller is http://www.4wdworld.com.au/edspage.php 

Hope that helps!

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